Locks of Love

These Locks of Love were fixed on the railing of one of the many bridges over the hundreds of canals in Venice near the Rialto Bridge. These padlocks are fixed by couples in love, on to a fence or a pole or metallic chain/string at a usually romantic and popular public place, to symbolize their eternal love. A couple would hang a padlock after inscribing their name or initials on it and throw the key away so that their love is locked forever. Some couple use two inter-twined locks, each lock bearing their name/initials. Besides lovers, often family members and close friends also put such locks at these places, to lock their relationship forever. The tradition probably originated from China where the love locks can be seen at several locations alongside the Great Wall of China and also in many temples and on the steps/paths leading to sacred peaks. Locks of love… Connected to each other for all eternity…

Locks of Love

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Christmas – That Magic Blanket…

Christmas is that magic blanket that wraps itself about us, that something so intangible that it is like a fragrance. It may weave a spell of nostalgia. Christmas may be a day of feasting, or of prayer, but always it will be a day of remembrance – a day in which we think of everything we have ever loved. – Augusta E. Rundel

Christmas CardI wish everyone a blessed and peaceful Christmas!

Ammamma – Grandmother

Ammamma is everyone’s grandmother – the oldest living female member of the family.¬†Just look at her face, those wonderful wrinkles of time, age, and wisdom…

Ammamma - Grandma

 

I took this photo last May at a pooja (a religious ritual performed by Hindus) in Edathua, Kerala, India last May. My husband is Indian and his family is from Kerala in the south of India. The pooja was held for all members of the family who passed away and to purify the living of the lingering negative energy of the deceased.

Ammamma is an amazing woman. Three years ago, when we got married in Kerala (with almost 400 people at our wedding—more about this in a later post :), she accepted me in the family with and open heart, no questions asked and without any reservations. This was not an obvious thing for every single member of the family as my flaws as an ideal bride were only multiplied by the fact that not only am I not South Indian, but I am neither North Indian, or Indian for that matter…

She is 87 years old. Look at her eyes, her hair, her face, her hands. Think of all the things she has seen and lived through. We don’t speak the same language, we do not have the same religion, we do not have the same background, I am almost 60 years her junior, and I want to hear everything she knows and has to say.