Haunting Beauty of Abandoned Buildings

Matthias Haker’s ‘Decay’ series chooses to focus on the rare beauty of decrepit spaces. The German born photographer is a media computer science student who began taking pictures in 2008. He has since developed an expansive portfolio with images of landscapes, weddings, people, urban activity and architecture.

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Peeling, rusted ceilings and chipped floors laden with sawdust prove to be quite alluring. The abandoned scenes were once occupied by families, health practices and students, evidenced by the moldy cribs and dental chairs.

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While the rooms have long since been used, they have still managed to retain their charm. The Decay project proves that there is relevancy in even the most neglected of buildings, seen here in the magnificent colors, winding staircases, record players and collectible vintage furniture.

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While these dilapidated spaces bring on a sense of melancholy in the viewer, Haker’s pictures have also brought out their haunting beauty—despite the peeling paint and debris-strewn floors, the former grandeur of these buildings remains very evident.

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Many of these abandoned sites feature magnificent details like beautifully painted walls, ornate stairways and embellished domed ceilings—it makes one wonder why they were forsaken in the first place.

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Ammamma – Grandmother

Ammamma is everyone’s grandmother – the oldest living female member of the family. Just look at her face, those wonderful wrinkles of time, age, and wisdom…

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I took this photo last May at a pooja (a religious ritual performed by Hindus) in Edathua, Kerala, India last May. My husband is Indian and his family is from Kerala in the south of India. The pooja was held for all members of the family who passed away and to purify the living of the lingering negative energy of the deceased.

Ammamma is an amazing woman. Three years ago, when we got married in Kerala (with almost 400 people at our wedding—more about this in a later post :), she accepted me in the family with and open heart, no questions asked and without any reservations. This was not an obvious thing for every single member of the family as my flaws as an ideal bride were only multiplied by the fact that not only am I not South Indian, but I am neither North Indian, or Indian for that matter…

She is 87 years old. Look at her eyes, her hair, her face, her hands. Think of all the things she has seen and lived through. We don’t speak the same language, we do not have the same religion, we do not have the same background, I am almost 60 years her junior, and I want to hear everything she knows and has to say.

It Was a Matter of a Few Seconds…Some Lights…and a 96 DSLR Camera Rig

Upon his return from a 3-month excursion filming in China with a bullet time rig, photographer Richard Kendall decided it was time to get back into the studio and start  experiments with lights, strobe flash, and the bullet time rig. One of these projects was creating a collection of stunning artistic light paintings. The result is this breathtaking video below.

In still photography, bullet time is achieved by surrounding the subject with multiple cameras that are mounted on a special ring shaped rig (often referred to as an array).  The camera are then set to fire either simultaneously or sequentially. Each of the photographs are then made into a time lapse so they create a super slow motion scene. Kendall used a half circle rig for his photo shoot, which required the use of 96 DSLR cameras!!!!!!!

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In the second video Patrick Rochon / Timecode Lab / Eric Paré have created “24×360” as a purely artistic and experimental project using 24 cameras and light painting techniques.

The project was born after a very intense year mounting and un-mounting their bullet time rig in live events. They then finally sat down at their studio to create some inspiring 360 degree bullet time pictures.

Hope you like them as much as I did!!! This is pretty stunning stuff.

Love,

F